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Date Title Outlet Notes
4/23/17 An Interview with NgÅ©gÄ© wa Thiong’o Los Angeles Review of Books Ngugi Wa Thiong'o, Distinguished Professor of comparative literature,  is interviewed by Nanda Dyssou, Congolese-Hungarian journalist and fiction writer in Los Angeles.
4/18/17 How a single gene could become a volume knob for human suffering Wired Erika Hayasaki, associate professor of literary journalism, introduces us to individuals on the opposite sides of the pain spectrum: one who is in constant, agonizing pain; another who has never felt any. Their genetic mutations share a commonality that could potentially end America's opioid epidemic.
4/13/17 The next big thing in tourism could be Little Saigon Orange County Register Linda Vo, professor of Asian American studies, said even though she sees a change in the community toward more openness she doubts Little Saigon will turn into another Little Tokyo.
4/9/27 Decolonising Faith: Here's How Some Africans Are Rediscovering Their Ancestors And Spirituality The Huffington Post Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Distinguished Professor of comparative literature, is described in the article as the "mascot for the project of decolonisation."
3/31/17 'A Literary Field Guide' blends poems and stories into 'a kaleidoscopic picture' of O.C. Los Angeles Times Now anyone can get a glimpse into this history with "Orange County: A Literary Field Guide," edited by Alvarez and Andrew Tonkovich, lecturer in the Department of English.
3/24/17 'Amazing stories of survival': UCI oral history project preserves Vietnamese refugees' hopes, fears and challenges Los Angeles Times "Even today, there's very little history on Vietnamese Americans from their perspective and their voices," said Linda Trinh Vo, professor of Asian American studies. "In Vietnam, they have basically written us out of the history books — those who left the country — and in America, they write about the war from the American side, particularly the veteran side, but very little about Vietnamese Americans."
3/20/17 What would MLK do if he were alive today: Six essential reads The Conversation As doctoral candidate in Visual Studies, Mary Schmitt explains, Selma was “a moment in civil rights history that played a crucial role in the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.”
3/19/17 Travel Ban Dampens Persian New Year Celebration New York Times Touraj Daryaee, a professor of history and director of the Center for Persian Studies, highlights the caution that many students are taking in returning home for Nowruz.
3/19/17 Gorsuch, a Conservative Firebrand in College, Evolved Into a Conciliator MSN Originally run in the Wall Street Journal, Irene Tucker, professor of English, explains, "He was committed to showing the way he was a freethinker and everyone else was conforming to the lockstep liberalism of the campus.”
3/19/17 What did the UN apartheid report expose in reality? Aljazeera Mark Le Vine, professor of history, reveals, “As Israel moves towards confronting apartheid, the questions raised by the report will become impossible to avoid.”
3/19/17 Gorsuch, a Conservative Firebrand in College, Evolved Into a Conciliator The Wall Street Journal Irene Tucker, professor of English, explains, "He was committed to showing the way he was a freethinker and everyone else was conforming to the lockstep liberalism of the campus.”
3/17/17 Trump’s budget cripples the EPA’s ability to keep drinking water safe Vox Andrew Highsmith, assistant professor of history, says, “If you look at the history of the Flint water crisis, the problems didn’t stem from too much enforcement at the federal level, but the opposite — too little.”
3/15/17 UC Irvine Professor Vicki Ruiz Pioneered the Study of Mexican-American Women—and Isn't Done OC Weekly "Ruiz is a giant in American history for doing something academia never bothered with until she came along: show that Mexican-American women in the past had lives outside of making babies and cooking," says OC Weekly writer Gustavo Arellano about Vicki Ruiz, Distinguished Professor of history and Chicano/Latino studies.
3/13/17 When did science become apolitical? Pacific Standard The idea that scientists are apolitical became entrenched and a generation of newly trained researchers forgot, perhaps, their contentious past. “As the research universities grew up, you see the production of scientists through these doctorate programs that are socialized to believe this,” says Doug Haynes, professor of history.
3/4/17 What would Mark Twain think of Donald Trump? Time Originally run in The Conversation, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, asks, “Thanks to the criticisms they’ve leveled in articles, interviews, tweets and letters to the editor, we know that many contemporary authors, from Philip Roth to J.K. Rowling, have a dim view of Donald J. Trump. But what would leading writers of the past have made of him?”
3/3/17 9 of the most powerful quotes from Ngugi wa Thiong'o's public lecture The Huffington Post Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Distinguished Professor of comparative literature, delivered a lecture titled "Secure the Base, Decolonise the Mind" at Wits University on Thursday evening.
3/2/17 What would Mark Twain think of Donald Trump? The Conversation Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, asks, “Thanks to the criticisms they’ve leveled in articles, interviews, tweets and letters to the editor, we know that many contemporary authors, from Philip Roth to J.K. Rowling, have a dim view of Donald J. Trump. But what would leading writers of the past have made of him?”
3/1/17 The WWII plan to mess with the Japanese by dyeing Mt. Fuji Atlas Obscura David Fedman, assistant professor of history, explains the late-WWII bombing campaigns against Japan: "Mt. Fuji was cast by the Japaneseas an alpine feature that bound the swelling imperial sphere together."
3/1/17 China’s battle to breathe NewStatesman Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, explains, "In China, what really can motivate people are much more tangible things that affect their daily life.”
3/3/17 Pre-fascism & the Muslim question Frontline Aijaz Ahmad, Chancellor’s professor of comparative literature, writes, "Islamophobia and a broad hatred of the non-white immigrant seem to be the two key themes in the early days of the presidency, as they were during the campaign. But the storm of opposition will also be great."
2/19/17 Trump widens a generation gap in Vietnamese community: Older hard-liners vs. liberal youths Los Angeles Times "The elders may be openly supporting Trump and the Republicans because they still feel an affinity for the party they view as fighting against the government that took over their homeland,” says Linda Vo, professor of Asian American studies.
2/15/17 Chinese students in the US are using “inclusion” and “diversity” to oppose a Dalai Lama graduation speech Quartz “If there were an objection to the Dalai Lama speaking on campus 10 years ago, you would not have seen the objection from Chinese students being framed within the rhetoric of diversity and inclusion,” says Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's professor of history.
2/13/17 Despite harsh rhetoric, Trump re-affirms 'one-China' policy with President Xi Southern California Public Radio Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's professor of history, speaks about President Donald Trump's reverse course on longstanding policy recognizing Beijing's authority in the region.
2/12/17 Should the judiciary defer to the executive on national security issues? Los Angeles Times Barry Siegel, director of UCI's Literary Journalism program, writes, "Three judges from the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals listened to a Justice Department lawyer urge them to reinstate President Trump’s ban on travel from seven largely Muslim nations."
2/8/17 Despite Trump’s isolationism, China isn’t ready to become the world’s moral leader The Huffington Post Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s professor of history, writes, "President Donald’s Trump’s rise is proving to be a boon for China. His first presidential actions and undiplomatic style have opened a void in global leadership."
2/5/17 Chinese cuisine starting to whet more American appetites Yibada Chinese restaurateurs have been trying to offer Chinese food as fine dining; but their efforts have remained largely unsuccessful until recently,” says Yong Chen, professor of history.
2/2/17 South Korea moves to curb presidential powers after Park scandal San Francisco Examiner “South Korea is no stranger to crises, which usually have the effect of re-concentrating power at the center,” writes David Fedman, assistant professor of history.
2/2/17 Hills Happenings: History professor to tell story behind 'Fahrenheit 451' Orange County Register Kai Evers, professor of German, will discuss the historical event that was the basis for Bradbury’s book, Fahrenheit 451.
2/1/17 Chinese cuisine evolves in U.S. as a matter of taste ECNS Yong Chen, professor of history, explains, "Chinese restaurateurs have been trying to offer Chinese food as fine dining; but their efforts have remained largely unsuccessful until recently."
1/31/17 South Korea moves to curb president’s power after park scandal Bloomberg "The same is true with suggestions to give more power to regions even though South Korea’s “highly centralized” decision-making process has “enhanced perceptions of a seemingly monarchical ‘court politics’ in the Blue House,” writes David Fedman, assistant professor of history.
1/31/17 There are echoes of China in today's America Time Jeffrey Wasserstrom, chancellor's professor of history, writes, "We are troubled by how often lately we experience a strange sort of China-related déjà vu when following events in the U.S."
1/27/17 Go behind the scenes as fortune cookie history gets made Time In this article, Yong Chen, professor of history, explains the curious history of fortune cookies. "American Protestant missionaries stationed in the south of China spread word of what was happening on the other side of the Pacific, and adventurous Chinese men were lured to America by the prospect of gold."
1/27/17 Even Trump’s most loyal fans say he can be abrasive and rude. Is it part of his success? (Audio) PRI Aaron James, professor of philosophy, poses viewing Donald Trump’s behavior not as liability but as appeal, perhaps even a key reason he was elected.
1/24/17 UC Irvine student experiences life as sports journalist Orange County Register This article features UC Irvine journalism student Caitlin Antonios. OC Register writer Eric Morgan describes her, saying, "There was never any doubt that being a journalist is what she wanted to do for a living."
1/18/17 9 questions about China you were too embarrassed to ask Vox Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's professor of history, writes, “You have propaganda videos coming out that are talking about America as an evil country trying to use conspiratorial plans to bring about the downfall of the Chinese Communist Party – but it’s still is a place that Communist Party leaders are sending their children to go to school."
1/18/17 In China, pollution fears are both literal and metaphorical (Commentary) NPR Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's professor of history, discusses artists in Chengdu and their actions against China's pollution.
1/16/2017 Is Al sexist? Foreign Policy Erika Hayasaki, associate professor in the UCI Literary Journalism Program, writes, "In the not-so-distant future, artificial intelligence will be smarter than humans. But as the technology develops, absorbing cultural norms from its creators and the internet, it will also be more racist, sexist, and unfriendly to women."
1/13/17 What can Ivanka Trump possibly do for women who work? The Nation Amy Wilentz, professor of English, writes, "For all the talk of how Ivanka has her father’s ear, on women’s issues or any other... he doesn’t listen to her. In interview after interview, she’s been clear about how little interest Trump has in her opinion."
1/12/2017 Trump through Chinese eyes (Opinion) The Japan Times Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom, Chancellor's professor of history, writes, "China no longer needs U.S. protection. Instead, it wants a U.S. president who is occupied largely with domestic issues, and is not much concerned with constraining China’s rise, as Barack Obama was."
1/12/17 Interview | Jeffrey Wasserstrom (Audio) National Committee on U.S. China Relations In this podcast interview, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, discusses relations between China and America in the dawning era of Xi and Trump.
1/10/17 Trump through Chinese eyes Project-Syndicate Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's professor of history, discusses China's response to our recent election and the attitude of China toward a president who isn't as concerned with constraining China's rise.
1/9/17 Culture-defining iPhone turns 10 today USA Today "The engineering is in the background, so the front end is really easy to use, with just a swipe or a poke of the finger," says Peter Krapp, professor of film & media studies.
1/9/17 Historians in the age of Trump Inside Higher Ed Vicki Ruiz, Distinguished Professor of history and Chicano studies, traced Trump’s rise to two familiar phenomena: nativism and gender discrimination.
1/4/17 Doubt trumping Chinese support for president-elect Orange County Register “There’s a fundamental confidence among Chinese Americans that the U.S. is stable, politically and socially,” said Yong Chen, professor of history.
1/4/17 The Oxford Illustrated History of Modern China (Video) China File Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s Professor of history is the editor of The Oxford Illustrated History of Modern China. He describes the book in a video interview.
1/1/17 The counterintuitive critics (PDF) The Chronicle of Higher Education Michael Szalay, professor of English, is described as taking one of the "central roles in the field."

Date Title Outlet Notes
12/6/2016 China asks U.S. to block Taiwan president trip after talk of Donald Trump meeting The Guardian Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's professor of history, said Beijing’s initial public response to Trump’s decision to engage with Taiwan’s leader had been “relatively measured."
12/3/16 Debt end: On impossibility and resistance at the end of growth This is Hell! Annie McClanahan, assistant professor of English, explores the rise of debt as the definining economic feature of American life, and explains how the mounting crises of 21st century capitalism provide a site of possibility for the indebted to reject the moral obligations and political machinations of the financial industry's intrusion into all aspects of society.
12/1/16 Fingerprints. Eyewitness accounts. Bite marks. All suspect? The L.A. public defender’s office decided it needed a scientist. The California Sunday Magazine Erika Hayasaki, associate professor of literary journalism, writes on Morris, a behavioral-sciences research analyst for the Los Angeles County Public Defender’s Office and the first person to ever hold the job. "She raises questions a lawyer might not even know to ask."
11/28/16 Presidential election sparks a rise in campus unrest The OC Register The day after Donald Trump was elected president, students at UC Irvine organized a march.
11/28/16 Traces of times lost The Atlantic Erika Hayasaki, associate professor of literary journalism, writes: "Infantile amnesia − adults’ inability to remember, in an episodic way, events from birth to early childhood − has been studied for over a century, and there’s still much that’s unknown. But what’s even more mysterious, and far less examined, is how much kids remember their younger years while they’re still children."
11/23/16 What's the history of sanctuary spaces and why do they matter? The Conversation Elizabeth Allen, associate professor of English, writes: "In the wake of the election of Donald Trump as president, faculty, students and alumni across the country are pressuring their administrations to declare 'sanctuary campuses' for undocumented students, workers and their families."
11/22/16 How the son of an African goat herder became a Nobel Prize contender The Washington Post Ngugi Wa Thiong’o, Distinguished professor of English and comparative literature, is Africa’s most celebrated novelist, a writer and activist who has been a perennial favorite to win the Nobel Prize in literature.
11/19/16 Trump's election creates anxiety around the world, UCI experts say Orange County Register Donald Trump’s election and its potential impact on international relations have been met across the globe with considerable anxiety and an unsettling sense of unpredictability, said UC Irvine professors who gathered this week to discuss what the rest of the world thinks of the next president. The event was organized by the UCI The Forum for the Academy and the Public.
11/16/16 “It was defiance”: An interview with Ngugi wa Thiong’o Financial Times In this article, Financial Times writer Neil Munshi interviews Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Distinguished Professor of English. "He reflects on war, exile, and his relationship with the country he loves."
11/11/16 The defiant 25-year-old woman at the heart of Hong Kong’s political meltdown Time “Some parts of the Chinese nationalism story that have been told by Beijing sometimes work in Hong Kong,” Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, says. “There have been very intentional efforts on the mainland to elevate the atrocities committed by the Japanese to a level comparable to the Holocaust.”
11/7/16 Historians, like voters, distressed by presidential race The Salem News Vicki Lynn Ruiz, Distinguished Professor of history, said, “This politics of fear propels us backwards.”
11/2/16 UCI's Black Lives Matter writing contest takes on issues affecting black community Daily Pilot This article features the Black Lives Matter writing contest sponsored by the school's Department of African American Studies and the campus Center for Excellence in Writing and Communication. The contest is accepting poetry, essays, short stories and other entries until Nov. 24.
10/30/16 How scary is too scary? Pop culture ramping up gore, fear Press-Telegram Jami Bartlett, an associate professor of English talked recently to her students about the rise of extreme horror in pop culture and entertainment. “A lot of my students say it’s compensation for the increased digitization of relationships,” Bartlett says. “There’s something about the materiality of the body that’s being ripped apart.
10/28/16 Chinese hits unknown in the West The Times Literary Supplement Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, explores the cultural and literary trends of China.
10/24/16 Finding freedom in the catacombs Qnatara.de Roxanne Varzi, an associate professor of film and media studies has presented the results of her research in a way that is rather unusual in academic circles, namely as fiction in the novel Last Scene Underground: an ethnographic novel of Iran, which tells the story of a group of students in Tehran who want to stage an illegal play underground.
10/20/16 Women who hate Trump, but aren’t with her The Atlantic “If you criticize HRC, it looks like you’re endorsing fascism,” said Catherine Liu, professor of film and media studies.
10/17/16 The thrill-seeking bodysurfers of California’s most terrifying wave Narratively Amy DePaul, lecturer in the Department of Literary Journalism, writes: "Bordered by a jetty that separates the Pacific on one side from the Newport Harbor entrance channel, the Wedge is also the name of this surfing venue’s signature wave – famous for shooting higher, harder and more abruptly than the peaks at almost all other surf spots in California."
10/17/16 What our editors are reading Los Angeles Times This article features the memoir of Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Distinguished Professor of English.
10/13/16 Ngugi wa Thiong’o on starting out as a writer The New York Times Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Distinguished Professor of English, recalls a boyhood growing up in a Kikuyu compound outside Nairobi in the 1940s and ’50s, when the Mau Mau uprising challenged British rule in his novel Dreams in a Time of War.
10/12/16 Ngugi wa Thiong'o: The College Years Literary Hub This article quotes Birth of a Dream Weaver: A Writer’s Awakening by Ngugi wa Thiong’o,  Distinguished Professor of English.
10/25/16 Ngugi wa Thiong’o awarded South Korea’s prestigious Pak Kyong-ni Literature Award This is Africa Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Distinguished Professor of English, has been awarded the prestigious Pak Kyong-ni Literature Award in recognition of his outstanding literary achievements.
10/7/16 Harriet Tubman and the twenty dollar bill C-SPAN In this video, Jessica Millward, associate professor of history, talks  about the historical significance of the decision to replace Andrew Jackson with Harriet Tubman on the front of the twenty dollar bill, as well as the reactions to the announcement.
10/6/16 The Oxford Illustrated History of Modern China by Jeffrey Wasserstrom (editor) Asian Review In The Oxford Illustrated History of Modern China, editor Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, makes a compelling case for beginning one’s investigations into the genesis of the modern Chinese state with the gradual decline of the Ming dynasty in the late sixteenth century.
10/5/16 UCI professor: 50 years later, The Battle of Algiers remains as relevant as ever OC Weekly Sohail Daulatzai, associate professor of film and media studies and African American studies, in his latest book, Fifty Years of The Battle of Algiers: Past as Prologue, doesn't simply celebrate the film's milestone, but rather he explores its many political meanings throughout history. For him, the classic is not only "a relic of the past," but also a "prescient and telling testament to the present."
10/5/16 Clinton, Trump, and the ends of great power hypocrisy [op-ed] Al Jazeera Mark Levine, professor of Middle Eastern History, writes: "The overlap in policies between the two candidates when it comes to supporting massive levels of violence across the Middle East is as troubling as it is depressing."
9/30/16 PW picks: Books of the week, October 3, 2016 Publishers Weekly Birth of a Dream Weaver: A Memoir of a Writer’s Awakening, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Distinguished Professor of comparative literature, has penned an eloquent, perceptive memoir about coming into his own as a writer.
9/29/16 Book report: Chop Suey, USA Crave The influence of Chinese cuisine throughout the 20th century and beyond is told in Chop Suey, USA: The Story of Chinese Food in America, by Yong Chen, professor of history.
9/29/16 Mangoes, K-Pop and KFC: Chinese Nationalism today TLS In this article, Jeff Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, poses a fruitful take on Chinese nationalism: "Tropical fruit, South Korean singers and Colonel Sanders make for an unusual political triumvirate."
9/23/16 Book Review: The Oxford Illustrated History of Modern China edited by Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom LSE Review of Books Jeff Wasserstrom's The Oxford Illustrated History of Modern China is reviewed by Tim Chamberlain, a Ph.D student from The London School of Economics and Political Science: "This is a beautifully illustrated, accessible and scholarly work that will serve as an excellent introduction to the country to researchers, students and the general public alike."
9/22/16 China: lawyer for Ai Weiwei jailed for 12 years in 'severe retaliation' The Guardian Speaking before Thursday’s sentencing, Jeff Wasserstrom, Chancellor's professor of history, said: “I’m really distressed. I’m more discouraged by political trends in China than I have been since the early 1990s and I think I’m not alone in that.”
9/21/16 Ngugi Wa Thiong'o wins 6th Pak Kyong-ni Literature Award The Dong-A Ilbo Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Distinguished Professor of comparative literature, has received the 6th Pak Kyong-ni Literature Award, Korea's first international literary award.
9/21/16 I won't dance, don't ask me Los Angeles Review of Books Lyle Masse , associate professor of art history and visual studies writes on her experience as a dancer: "On my fiftieth birthday, I was predictably thrown into crisis. Banal or otherwise, this crisis was the reason I found myself in a shabby rehearsal room at the University of California, Irvine, clumsily trying to learn the introductory sequence of steps to Yvonne Rainer’s canonical work of dance and performance art, Trio A."
9/20/16 Fighting for an intervention in history in the face of dreams deferred in the making: Twenty years of South African democracy Taylor and Francis Online Tiffany Willoughby-Herard, associate professor of African American studies, authored "Fighting for an intervention in history in the face of dreams deferred in the making: Twenty years of South African democracy," which is featured in Routledge's Activism! Voices for Change issue. The issue highlights diverse research across the Routledge Social Sciences portfolio, with particular emphasis on Gender, Ethnicity and Sociology.
9/20/16 America's growing anti-intellectualism Wisconsin Public Radio In this radio segment, Catherine Liu, professor of film and media studies, comments on the "growing anti-intellectualism and dumbing down of America, [that's] on full display in younger generations who refuse to read actual books and whose media diet consists of digital "crap" from their social media feeds."
9/12/16 To create a more diverse faculty, start with tenure Marketplace In this article, Douglas Haynes, vice provost for academic equity, diversity and inclusion, and professor of history, discusses the benefits of investing in the making of the individual faculty member.
9/8/16 Great helmsman or ruinous dictator? China remembers Mao, 40 years after death The Guardian Despite all this, Jeff Wasserstrom, a Chancellor's Professor of history, said Mao remained a revered figure in some parts of China. “This is going to be a very selective commemoration of parts of Mao’s life, that aren’t the ones that we necessarily dwell upon outside of China,” Wasserstrom said of this week’s memorials.
9/6/16 It's a small world Delta Sky Magazine “The last decades have seen life in the city move away from the sort of drab authoritarianism George Orwell imagined in 1984 toward the more hedonistic version Huxley dreamed up,” says Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history. “First came glittering department stores, now rides that thrill the senses.”
9/2/16 People of the Riverbed Voice of OC Mariah Castaneda, a student in the Department of Literary Journalism, writes: "While the ever-growing population at the Santa Ana Civic Center is the most visible example of the county's failure to adequately address homelessness, as many as 500 people now live in the bed of the Santa Ana River."
8/12/16 Hillary Clinton does not represent all women − and makes some feel powerless truthdig Catherine Liu, professor of film and media studies, comments on the upcoming presidental elections: "I think our California senators have not been very progressive, and they’re both women."
8/10/16 China's crackdown on dissent is described as the harshest in decades Los Angeles Times Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, comments on China's international treatment. “There hasn’t been that much of a cost, so far at least, for Xi Jinping. He literally got the royal treatment when he went to England. He wasn’t being treated like someone who deserved to be kept at arm’s length."
8/4/16 Poem-A-Day - 'Dear Reader' by Amy Gerstler The Spectrum In this article, Amy Gerstler, professor in the School of Humanities' M.F.A. program, is featured by Spectrum. Her poem 'Dear Reader' is listed as the poem of the day.
8/3/16 Whicker: Olympics may cause more problems than they resolve, but there will be dancing in Rio regardless Orange County Register Steven Topik, professor of history, discusses Rio and its standing during the Olympics: “They wanted to show they’ve become part of the developed world, and by most measures they have."
8/2/16 Finding a voice as a Riot Grrrl The Huffington Post Vega Darling, UCI alumnus with B.A. in film & media studies, discusses his film project "GRRRL: 25 Years of Riot Grrrl" which explores Seattle's "riot grrl" movement in the 1990s.
7/27/16 A letter from young Asian-Americans to their families about Black Lives Matter NPR This episode, NPR talks with Claire Kim, a professor of Asian-American studies, whose work focuses on anti-blackness.
7/26/2016 Historians on Donald Trump: A huge hit on Facebook History News Network In this article, History News Network discusses the anti-Trump Facebook page set up by David McCullough and Ken Burns that went live with over 5 million views, featuring posts by Vicki Ruiz, Distinguised Professor of history and Chicano/Latino studies.
7/26/16 Five things about Trump’s rise that would make Xi Jinping smile The Huffington Post Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's professor of history, writes, "There are obvious reasons why Vladimir Putin would like the next occupant of the White House to be someone who questions whether America should give unconditional support to NATO allies. What, though, does Xi Jinping think of the prospect of a Donald Trump victory in November?"
7/22/16 Chinese Nationalism and the Colonel's Chicken The Los Angeles Review of Books Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, writes: "One thing that began happening this week, though, has definitely triggered powerful 1999 flashbacks − protesters in various cities lashing out at Kentucky Fried Chicken as a symbol of America."
7/22/16 How a self-taught hacker escaped a cult Glamour Erika Hayasaki, Associate Professor of literary journalism writes a story on Shyama Rose: "The computer Shyama Rose got for her 14th birthday was a boxy Macintosh Quadra 650. The year was 1994."
7/18/16 Why Nice? Don’t ignore France’s troubled colonial legacy The Conversation Ian Coller, professor of history, gives his insight on Olivier Roy's controversial thesis. "But what sets the spark to this Molotov cocktail of aggression? Sociologist Olivier Roy has argued that this is not a radicalization of Islam, but rather an 'Islamization of radicalism.' It’s a controversial thesis, but in this case it seems he may well be right."
7/17/16 Israel-Palestine: A way to end the occupation Al Jazeera Mark LeVine, professor of Middle Eastern History, writes: "The question remains, what will it take before Palestinians avail themselves of their final "nuclear" strategy, and how much violence will the Israeli government deploy before it is forced to re-imagine itself as a very different society than it has become during the last half century?"
7/17/16 The reason 'sanctuaries' have never been safe ATTN "During slavery African Americans would meet in secret to worship and plot rebellions," said Jessica Millward, professor of history. "The church targeted by Dylann Roof in the Charleston shooting had a long history in the Black community."
7/16/16 China: More hegemon than bogeyman? The Japan Times Jeffrey Wasserstrom’s perceptive new book, Eight Juxtapositions: China Through Imperfect Analogies, presents some unlikely comparisons that are designed to challenge perceptions about China. Wasserstrom, professor of history, acknowledges flaws in his analogies, but makes a persuasive case that they are useful in making sense of contemporary China.
7/14/16 500 words from Jeffrey Wasserstrom Asian Books Blog In this article, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, professor of history talks about selecting his illustrations for his new reference book, the Oxford Illustrated History of Modern China.
7/14/16 Asking for a friend: I’m very privileged – can I still apply for fellowships meant to help people of color? The Nation Catherine Liu, professor of film and media studies, tells Nation that being anointed as a representative of elite diversity isn’t always good for people: “I’ve seen young people of color from very privileged backgrounds having trouble figuring out who they are.” Once you get a lot of career rewards for being a “person of color,” whatever that means, you may find you have to keep performing this identity.
7/13/16 Here’s why Donald Trump is horrifying, according to historians The Huffington Post Vicki Ruiz, Distinguished professor of history and Chicano/Latino studies, put Trump’s hateful rhetoric toward immigrants in the context of anti-immigrant attitudes of the 20th century. She explained how the Ku Klux Klan targeted Catholics − who were seen as “foreign agents” − in the 1920s and how Congress passed the Johnson-Reed Act, which imposed immigration quotas, in 1924.
7/5/16 Episode 089: Jessica Millward, slavery & freedom in early Maryland Ben Franklin’s World Today, we explore the life of Charity Folks, an enslaved woman from Maryland who gained her freedom in the late-18th century. Our guide through Charity’s life is Jessica Millward, an associate professor of history and author of Finding Charity’s Folk: Enslaved and Free Black Women in Maryland.
7/4/16 Hong Kong vs. Goliath Asian American Writer’s Workshop Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's professor of history, writes: "On Sunday June 19, Hong Kong-based musician Denise Ho sang for her fans at a special concert on Po Hing Fong, a street in the upscale, artsy Hong Kong neighborhood “PoHo.” At the same time and in the same place, a bigger show sponsored by the French-owned international brand Lancôme was supposed to take place, but it didn’t − the cosmetic maker got cold feet about being involved in anything associated with the bleached-haired controversial Canto-pop star."
7/1/16 Writing China: Xi Jinping, Pope Francis, and the imperfect analogy The Wall Street Journal In his forthcoming book, Eight Juxtapositions: China Through Imperfect Analogies from Mark Twain to Manchukuo, Chancellor's Professor of history Jeffrey Wasserstrom encourages new ways of thinking about China with a set of abstract essays.
6/26/16 Europe after Brexit Telos David T. Pan, professor in the Department of European Languages and Studies writes,"With the Brexit vote, Europe is now faced with the curious situation in which its default lingua franca would no longer in fact be one of its official languages."
6/26/16 Why Brexit won History News Network Luke Reader, Ph.D. candidate in history, writes, "Brexit was a bad decision, but historians should look beyond immigration when explaining why Britain left the EU. EU withdrawal is an expression of anger toward long-term economic deprivation and the failure of governments to direct funding, public services, and infrastructure towards those most in need."
6/24/16 Water crisis in Flint American Forum In this article, Andrew Highsmith, professor of history, is featured in a discussion of the "real origin of a public policy train wreck like the water crisis in Flint."
6/24/16 What would Mao have made of Xi Jinping’s China? South China Morning Post Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s Professor of history, says notwithstanding his fondness for quoting Mao, the current chairman’s enthusiasm for Confucian values, for one, would not have impressed.
6/21/16 TIME interviews Jeffery Wasserstrom TIME In this video, TIME interviews Jeffrey Wasserstrom, professor of history about China's political situation.
6/4/16 UCI class looks at the history behind selfies The Los Angeles Times In this article, professor Catherine Liu, professor of Asian American studies, says, "The goal is to study the selfie as a way for young people to express themselves online. They are trying to understand themselves and their place in the world. This is just as other generations have done, and they have different technologies from which to do so."
6/4/16 Jim Lahey The New York Times In this article, New York Times writer Kate Murphy describes Jim Lahey's interest in Assholes: A Theory written by Aaron James, who is a professor of philosophy. "I bought it after reading the quotes in the beginning, including the quintessential asshole quote, “Do you know who I am?!”"
6/2/16 Remembering and forgetting repression in China Dissent Magazine Jeffrey Wasserstrom, professor of history, writes, "When the anniversary of 1989’s June 4 Massacre arrives later this week, it will provide its annual reminder of a basic fact about contemporary China: the country’s leaders remain determined to control the flow of information about sensitive subjects."
5/31/16 Defending the faith: School program aims to prove Bible stories through evidence, technology Orange County Register Aaron James, professor of philosophy, says, “It might be a disservice to the students if it (apologetics) is used as a tool of persuasion. One could argue that it would do them better to teach them open critical thinking, like philosophy.”
5/31/16 The study of world religions in a time of crisis Books & Culture In this article, Writer Tae Sun interviews Jack Miles, professor of English and religious studies at UC Irvine.
5/26/16 James Carter & Jeffrey Wasserstrom: In China, it's 1946 again Gulf Today In this article, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, draws parallels between China now and China 70 years ago.
5/24/16 To understand China's President Xi Jinping, don't look to Mao Tse-tung, look to Chiang Kai-shek The Los Angeles Times In this article, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, writes on China's current leader, President Xi Jinping, which might be more comparable to Chiang Kai-shek: "China’s leader, its strongest in years, runs the government, commands the army, and directs a tightly disciplined party that takes a dim view of opposition."
5/24/16 In Little Saigon, Latino and Vietnamese cultures merge via restaurant workers The Los Angeles Times Linda Vo, professor of Asian American studies, explains how Latinos are increasingly working along with Vietnamese shop owners. “Immigration has stopped for Vietnam. These shop owners had to look for another employee source so they continue to turn to Latinos who are still coming in as newer immigrants,” said Linda Vo, a professor of Asian American studies at UC Irvine.
5/17/16 What to call Donald Trump Slate In this podcast, Aaron James, professor of philosophy, explains his theory on the different types of A-holes and where Trump fits in.
5/16/16 10 remarkable O.C. women Orange Coast Magazine Vicki L. Ruiz, Distinguished Professor of history and chair of Chicano/Latino studies, is listed as a "Distinguished Historian" on Orange Coast Magazine's list of "10 Remarkable O.C. Women."
5/15/16 The people-watching paradise at Mao's Mausoleum OZY In this article, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, comments on how many people have a complicated view of Mao's leadership, since he was both a "charismatic leader who reformed his country but also a ruthless one who wreaked atrocities on his people."
5/15/16 Relative to ordinary homicides in South L.A., the Grim Sleeper case got a lot of attention Los Angeles Times Miles Corwin, professor of literary journalism, writes on how "media coverage leads to police action."
5/11/16 How will China mark the 50th anniversary of the Cultural Revolution? The Nation Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history highlights how this month marks the anniversary of two surges of youth activism in China.
5/6/16 How did the Flint crisis happen? Andrew Highsmith (Video) American Forum Andrew Highsmith, professor of history, discusses the crisis in Flint as being rooted in decades of failed urban renewal efforts, questionable corporate conduct, and the often misunderstood reality of racial segregation in the North and Midwest on PBS So Cal World.
5/3/16 Under pressure: How Millennials cope with real world challenges (Audio) Southern California Public Radio Darren White, journalism and film major, gives his take on how "The American Dream" has changed especially for millennials.
4/29/16 China’s Cultural Revolution and the scars that linger The Financial Times Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, writes, "Two contrasting accounts of Mao Zedong’s socio-political movement explore a period of upheaval that the country is yet to reckon with."
4/25/16 Four UCI Faculty Named to Academy Orange County Business Journal Margaret Gilbert, professor of philosophy will be inducted in October into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
4/23/16 The Currency Question: Andrew Jackson and Chairman Mao The Diplomat In this article, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history; and Maura Cunningham, Ph.D. candidate in history; explain how the convergences and divergences between America and China tell us a lot about each country’s current trajectory.
4/23/16 China and Russia revisited Dissent Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, expresses that scholars who focused on Russia and specialists in Chinese studies once felt a kinship in studying large countries that had command economies, Leninist systems of rule, and propaganda systems that often focused on exposing nefarious Western conspiracies to undermine Communism.
4/21/16 Back in Irvine Her Campus In this article, Julie Schulte, a graduate student, describes how the MFA program at UCI has been one of the best parts of her journey here in Irvine.
4/20/16 Four UCI faculty named to academy Orange County Business Journal Margaret Gilbert, professor of philosophy, will be inducted in October into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
4/10/16 In a perpetual present: the strange case of the woman who couldn't remember her past--and can't imagine her future Wired In this article, Erika Hayasaki, associate professor of literary journalism, tells the story of Susan McKinnon, the first person ever identified with a condition called severely deficient autobiographical memory.
4/8/16 David Fedman on The Whale That Fell in Love with a Submarine Los Angeles Review of Books David Fedman, assistant professor of Japanese and Korean history,  reviews the book The Whale That Fell in Love with a Submarine and discusses what the author dubs as the "scorched-earth generation."
3/29/2016 Short story by NgÅ©gÄ© wa Thiong'o translated into over 30 languages in one publication The Guardian A fable by NgÅ©gÄ© wa Thiong’o, Distinguished Professor of English and comparative literature, has been translated into over 30 languages, making it “the single most translated short story in the history of African writing."
3/28/16 The great fall of China The Wall Street Journal Jeffrey Wasserstrom, chancellor's professor of history, reviews Mr. Shambaugh's latest book, China's Future, which Wassterstrom describes as "a book that offers good short takes on key trends − from the growth of consumer spending to rapid urbanization − that have transformed a country of villages into one with cities whose sheer magnitude is hard to grasp."
3/27/16 UCI professor to get Alumni Association's award Orange County Register Michael Clark, vice provost for academic planning and professor of English, will be recognized by the university's Alumni Association with its highest honor, the Extraordinarius award, at its 46th annual Lauds & Laurels ceremony in May.
3/25/16 In Colombia, how Palenque's native tongue went from a dying language to a living treasure AZ Central In this article, Armin Schwegler, professor of Spanish and Portuguese, discusses how Palenquero is a language that faces an significant decrease in use in Colombia.
3/25/16 Belgium has divided and decentralized itself almost out of existence The Conversation In this article, Georges Van Den Abbeele, dean of the School of Humanities, comments on the transformation of Belgium as a functional unit: "Belgium is no longer a nation-state in any functional sense, but rather a “federation” of three different regions..."
3/15/16 Q and A: Laguna Hills artist Lydia Ringwald talks about her works, now on display at Aliso Viejo Library Orange County Register In this article, writer Christopher Yee does a Q&A with Lydia Ringwald, alumna from the Department of Comparative Literature. "When Lydia looks for inspiration for her artwork, she looks to ancient history and mythology. The gods and goddesses of Mesopotamia, Troy, Tibet and other cultures appear in her mixed-media creations, which are inspired in a large part by her travels and studies."
3/10/16 Secure the Base: Making Africa Visible in the Globe by Ngugi wa Thiong'o, book review: A vital, timely examination The Independent In this article, writer Ekow eshun reviews Secure the Base, a book written by Ngugi wa Thiong'o, distinguished professor of comparative literature: "In this short, tightly argued collection of lectures and essays, he writes with the aim of 'making Africa visible in the world' by tracing the lattice of political and moral ties that stretch across the globe and back to Africa."
3/9/16 China through Imperfect analogies with Jeffrey Wasserstrom China Lab Jeffrey Wasserstrom, chancellor's professor of history, speaks about his newest book, Eight Juxtapositions: China through imperfect analogies from Mark Twain to Manchukuo, which illuminates nuances and deconstructs the facile comparisons that dominate so much thinking and writing about China today.
2/29/16 The spirit of May 35th The American Scholar Jeffrey Wasserstrom, chancellor's professor of history, reviews The Most Wanted Man in China: My Journey from Scientist to Enemy of State by Fang Lizhi: "Reading Fang’s memoir reminds us that China, for all its materialistic striving and authoritarian control, is a place where humor and laughter abound, where you hear plenty of jocular banter and kidding around."
2/27/16 Arguing With My Father About Hillary Clinton’s Ruthlessness BuzzFeed Catherine Liu, professor of film & media studies, writes, observes, and analyzes her father's seemingly paradoxal dedication to Hillary's campaign: "In the Clintons, my father sees political stability. He wants more of the same: cunning political and cultural compromises to mask intensifying economic polarization."
2/25/16 Human Rights in China with Jeffrey Wasserstrom Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Devin Stewart speaks to  Jeffrey Wasserstrom, chancellor's professor of history, about the current state of Chinese media, politics, leadership, and human rights. They also discuss the country's anti-corruption campaign, Chinese history, and Wasserstrom's new book Eight Juxtapositions: China Through Imperfect Analogies.
2/24/16 The benefits of digital learning platforms Digital Book World In this article, Lynda Haas, a lecturer in the Department of English, discusses adaptive learning technology, an innovative component to learning platforms that is able to individualize lessons to assess the students’ knowledge.
2/22/16 Hong Kong Film Awards won’t be aired in mainland China China Film Insider In this article, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, chancellor's professor of history, discusses the control of the information and media flow in China that dictates what may be discussed or revealed to the Chinese public.
2/19/16 Flash Friday: Grandma's sex robot The Guardian This short story, written by William Hawkins, a student in the MFA Program in Fiction, explores how far the relationship between humans and artificial intelligence could go.
2/17/16 Big muscle in Little Saigon Orange County Register In this article, Linda Trinh Vo, professor of Asian American studies, comments on the impact of the first Vietnamese American being seated in the state legislature: “It elevated the political clout of the Vietnamese community and people started paying attention to the community."
2/17/16 Hollywood’s piracy problem The Conversation Peter Krapp, professor in the Department of Film & Media Studies, discusses and offers background on the growing issue of movie leaking.
2/15/16 An Italian student's death in Egypt and now we care? Aljazeera Mark Levine, professor of Middle Eastern history, renders the events in Egypt as the "competing and independent power centres that are more characteristic of a failing 1990s-era sub-Saharan African state than the kind of cohesive regime that has long defined Egyptian politics."
2/13/16 Full Frame CCTV Yong Chen, history professor and author of Chop Suey USA, talks about Chinese cuisine and its cultural significance.
2/11/16 The truths fiction tells Stanford University Press Blog Roxanne Varzi, affiliated faculty in the Department of Film & Media Studies, explains, "Ethnography and literature have in common a very fluid boundary between the real and the fictive."
2/9/16 Cubans stranded in Central America try to reach the US Al Jazeera English In this article, Anita Casavantes Bradford, a professor of Chicano/Latino studies, comments on the migrants of Cuba as part of a larger, Cold War political propaganda.
2/8/16 Flint's struggles began with GM's move to suburbs in 1940s, historian says Michigan Radio In this audio, Andrew Highsmith, assistant professor of history, is interviewed concerning his book Demolition Means Progress: Flint, Michigan and the Fate of the American Metropolis and the ongoing Flint crisis.
2/4/16 In China, books that make money, and enemies The New York Times In this article, Jeffrey Wasserstorm, chancellor's professor of history, joins the conversation with New York Times writers Michael Forsythe and Andrew Jacobs about the politics behind banned books in China.
2/3/16 How racism and anti-tax fervor laid the groundwork for Flint’s water crisis Think Progress At the turn of the 20th century, the city’s prospects were rosy. Flint was founded as the “quintessential company town,” according to Andrew Highsmith, assistant professor of history and author of Demolition Means Progress, when General Motors incorporated and picked it as its headquarters in 1908.
2/1/16 Chinese restaurants thriving beyond takeout China Daily USA Changes and upgrades in the Chinese restaurant industry moved with the flow of Chinese immigration, according to research by Yong Chen, professor of Asian-American history.
1/29/16 Flint's toxic water crisis was 50 years in the making Los Angeles Times Andrew Highsmith, assistant professor of history, highlights the key details in understanding Flint's water disaster as one that was in the making.
1/29/16 Edward Snowden in Conversation with Barton Gellman Los Angeles Review of Books This article discusses the LARB co-sponsored forum held at UC Irvine: "What Cannot Be Said: Freedom of Expression in a Changing World."
1/29/16 Flying rats and festive fireworks The Wall Street Journal In this article, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, chancellor's professor of history, writes a book review on The Gunpowder Age, which discusses the story of gunpowder's evolution.
1/27/16 Remembrance of the victims of National Socialism Deutscher Bundestag Ruth Klüger, Professor emerita of German, addressed the German Parliament as the principal speaker for their version of Holocaust Remembrance Day (Gedenkstunde der Opfer des Nationalsozialismus).
1/26/16 Holocaust survivor Ruth Klüger: 'Germany has changed' Deutsche Welle In this article, Ruth Klüger, Professor emerita of German, speaks to DW about Auschwitz, getting older and her speech in the German Bundestag.
1/25/16 5 things that make it hard to be a black student at a mostly white college Think Progress In this article that considers the difficulties of ethnicity, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, chancellor's professor of history, comments, “Recent scholarship has shown that asymmetries of power and distortions of understanding are created whenever only certain people are described as having an ‘ethnicity’ or being ‘gendered’ subjects – that is, as having marked identities."
1/22/16 How austerity poisoned the people of Flint, Michigan Deutsche Welle In this article, Andrew Highsmith, assistant professor of history, comments on Flint's water crisis and the respective government action that has been taken in its respect.
1/22/16 Saving a language, one lesson at a time Los Angeles Times Karen Leonard, professor of anthropology, agrees on the difficulties that the language of Telugu may face in light of future generations: "Sometimes the kids marry within the community, but they may not, and since India has 19 or more vernacular languages, even if they marry another Indian, it might be a totally different language."
1/21/16 Experts: Flint could be 'canary in coal mine' for nationwide challenges FOX11 News In this article, Andrew Highsmith, assistant professor of history, offers possible causes for the unsafe water that flowed through the pipes in Flint for more than a year.
1/21/16 Swede’s crime confession on China TV rattles foreign groups The Wall Street Journal Wall Street Journal writer Josh Chin features Jeffrey Wasserstrom, chancellor's professor of history, and his insight on the "growing difficulty of determining where Beijing’s political red lines are − and the harsher punishments meted out for crossing them."
1/9/16 Then They Came for the Bookseller by Jeffrey Wasserstrom Los Angeles Review of Books In this review, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, chancellor's professor of history, comments on the ongoing threats to free expression in Hong Kong.
1/9/16 The latest threats to freedom in Hong Kong The Huffington Post In this article, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, chancellor's professor of history, parallels the world of Wester Berlin during the Cold War to Hong Kong's situation before the 1997 Handover.
1/4/16 Persia is My Heart Books Combined In this article, Roxanne Varzi, associate professor in the Department of Anthropology writes on her book, Persia is My Heart, a story that especially appealed to her mother, who had her own difficulties as a female chemist in 1960s America.
1/1/16 How the Internet changed the way we read The Daily Dot Jackson Bliss, a lecturer in the English department, writes, "As a professor of literature, rhetoric, and writing at the University of California, Irvine, I've discovered that one of the biggest lies about American culture (propagated even by college students) is that Americans don’t read."
1/1/16 'Comfort women' debate continues in conflicted O.C. The Los Angeles Times David Fedman, assistant professor of Japanese and Korean history,  provides commentary on the means that the Japanese government has decided to to alleviate the thousands of Korean women forced to be the sexual slaves of Japanese soldiers during World War II.

Date Title Outlet Summary
12/30/15 Biding Time Until China’s Outlook Clears The New York Times Residents in Beijing and other northern cities waited for the smog to come and go. It would be “tempting to say – though it seems inapt given how bad the air has been in Beijing lately – that a lot of people were waiting to exhale,” said Jeffrey Wasserstrom, professor of history.
12/16/15 Longreads Best of 2015: Crime reporting Longreads In this article, Erika Hayasaki, assistant professor of literary journalism, recommends  The Untold Story of the Silk Road by Joshuah Bearman, as seen assigned to her students enrolled in "Narratives in the Digital Age."
12/16/15 Why aren't you banned yet? Los Angeles Review of Books Jeffrey Wasserstrom, chancellor's professor of history, writes, "The reality is I can’t be considered courageous in the way I write about China precisely because I am not worried about being banned. Even if I were permanently denied access to the mainland, I could do just fine, given my career stage, field, and aspirations."
12/14/15 UCI's Jessica Millward uncovers nearly lost slavery story in book out today OC Weekly In this article, OC weekly features Finding Charity's Folk, a book written by Jessica Millward, associate professor of history, on the world of enslaved women.
12/11/15 Visa-waiver ban won't stop terrorism Al Jazeera English Mark LeVine, professor of Middle Eastern history, writes, "Americans are in a quandary, desperate to act but unable to share in responsibility for the violence around them."
12/7/15 The Shadow − A hundred years of Orson Welles The New Yorker In his article on Orson Welles, author Alex Ross mentions It's All True, a book authored by Catherine Benamou, associate professor of film & media studies, and calls it a "a masterpiece of scholarship."
11/27/15 From Roma to refugees: Sweden's impossible choices Al Jazeera English Mark LeVine, professor of Middle Eastern history, writes on the "large-scale refugee absorption by Sweden" that reveals a "series of political, social and moral inconsistencies."
11/23/15 Precious Windows into an Opaque Period Los Angeles Review of Books Sarah Mellors, doctoral student in the Department of History, reviews the book Maoism at the Grassroots: Everyday Life in China’s Era of High Socialism by Matthew D. Johnson and Jeremy Brown.
11/20/15 Going back to Hong Kong − One year after The Huffington Post Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, shares his experience speaking at the Hong Kong International Literary Festival.
11/18/15 Hong Kong revisited The LARB Blog Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, discusses his speech on the Umbrella Movement during the Hong Kong International Literary Festival.
11/18/15 Interview − Jeffrey Wasserstrom E-International Relations Ivan Lidarev conducts an interview with Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, on his scholarly research and advice for students of international relations.
11/15/15 Go ahead, blame Islam Al Jazeera English Mark LeVine, professor of Middle Eastern history, writes, "The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant doesn't equal 'Islam', a reality demonstrated by its daily brutality against fellow Muslims. And yes, Muslims are the biggest victims of Muslim terror (and most everyone else's terrorism too, it's worth noting)."
11/15/15 Why Paris? The Conversation Ian Coller, associate professor of history, writes an article questioning the attacks on Paris with thorough consideration of its history and colonization: "The choice of Paris is as much about a perverted kind of cultural resentment as it is about history..." The article was also printed in Fortune.
11/11/15 The Xi-Ma meeting: Why Singapore? The Diplomat Chancellor's Professor of history Jeffrey Wasserstrom dissects last Saturday’s Singapore summit between Xi Jinping, the Chinese Communist Party leader, and Ma Ying-jeou, the leader of Taiwan.
11/6/15 UC Irvine to offer courses on India's religions Orange County Register This article highlights the introduction of a new option for UC Irvine students in which they may study about lesser-known religions from South Asia such as Sikhism and Jainism. Although the university does not have a separate department for religious studies, John R. "Jack" Miles, professor of English and director of the program in religious studies, expresses the newly endowed chairs to be a "wonderful step in that direction."
11/4/15 Taiwan’s Meeting With China Is the Latest Chapter in Their History of Intermittent Cooperation Time "On Saturday, a new chapter in the annals of China and Taiwan will be written by two men — one who hopes to cement his place in that history, and another who is simply adding a page to a lately begun chapter of his own," writes Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history. In this article, Wasserstrom contextualizes the upcoming meeting of China’s Xi Jinping and his Taiwan counterpart Ma Ying-jeou.
11/2/15 Why Hollywood doesn't 'get' hackers Fortune Peter Krapp, professor of film and media Studies, criticized the “Homeland” episode for multiple implausibilities, not the least of which was that the CIA’s top secret files are depicted as residing in directories clearly marked “CIA.”
10/29/15 China ends its decades-old 'one-child' policy KPCC The nation's ruling Communist party declared an end to its decades-old "one-child" policy. All married couples will now be allowed to have two kids. Jeffrey Wasserstrom, professor of history, joined the show with more.
10/31/15 Une petite révolution chinoise La Presse Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, is quoted in this Montreal publication on the end of China's one-child policy.
10/30/15 Vampires, Zombies & Werewolves, Oh My! The Origins of Halloween Monsters Live Science Zombies are what Amy Wilentz, professor of English, called a "New World phenomenon." In a piece she wrote in 2012 for The New York Times, Wilentz described how modern ideas about zombies arose from the blending of old African religious beliefs and "the pain of slavery" that defined Haiti before it gained independence from France at the turn of the 19th century.
10/28/15 The Tragic, Forgotten History of Zombies The Atlantic In this article, Amy Wilentz, professor of English, points out in her writing on zombies that on several occasions after the revolution Haiti teetered on the brink of reinstating slavery. The zombies of the Haitian Voodoo religion were a more fractured representation of the anxieties of slavery, mixed as they were with occult trappings of sorcerers and necromancy.
10/19/15 Here’s Why Xi Jinping’s ‘Chinese Dream’ Differs Radically From the American Dream Time Jeffrey Wasserstrom, chancellor's professor of history, clarifies the difference between "The Chinese Dream" referred to by Xi Jinping and "The American Dream" that Xinping places in comparison.
10/15/15 A Criminal Mind The California Sunday Magazine Erika Hayasaki, associate professor of literary journalism, writes a story on Joel Dreyer: "For 40 years, Joel Dreyer was a respected psychiatrist who oversaw a clinic for troubled children, belonged to an exclusive country club, and doted on his four daughters and nine grandchildren. Then, suddenly, he became a major drug dealer. Why?"
10/13/15 Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o: Memories of who we are The Huffington Post "Memory is what makes us who we are," says Kenyan Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o − Distinguished Professor of English and comparative literature and a frequent contender for the Nobel− in this video about how colonizers sought to erase the memories of the natives by severing their linguistic connections.
10/6/15 The future of speech and 'microaggressions' on college campuses Southern California Public Radio On the next AirTalk on the road, Larry Mantle is heading to the University of California, Irvine for a lively discussion about the future of speech on American campuses with Doug Haynes, professor of history.
10/5/15 Nobel Prize 2015 bettling odds: Who are the literature, peace, and physics favorites? International Business Times  Kenyan author Ngugi Wa Thiong'o, Distinguished Professor of English and comparative literature at the University of California, Irvine, is tied with Murakami at 6-1 in the running for the Nobel.
10/3/15 Hispanic Heritage Month NBC Vicki Ruiz, Distinguished Professor of history, received one the highest honors from the president-- the National Humanities medal. Upon receiving the award, she comments, "What I want people to know is that Latinos did not arrive a day before yesterday."
9/30/15 Wild advice: Best-selling author Cheryl Strayed shares life lessons from the trail Happenings Georges Van Den Abbeele, Ph.D. and Dean of the School of Humanities, listens as panelist in Cheryl Strayed's talk on her 1,000 mile trek along the Pacific Crest Trail, famously recounted in her book Wild.
9/30/15 Mark Zuckerberg, Joshua Wong, and the curious lure of the Chinese market Dissent Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, writes, "Last week, while some commentators mused on the possibility of Pope Francis and Xi Jinping bumping into each other during their dueling high-profile U.S. tours, I pondered instead what two much younger men would say if they ran into each other in Washington, D.C."
9/29/15 "Vietnamese in Orange County" book event South Coast Repertory A collection of photos from UC Irvine’s Southeast Asian Archive Center was compiled by Linda Trinh Võ, professor and director of the Vietnamese American Oral History Project. The collection of photos found in her book  Vietnamese in Orange County inspired Vietgone playwright Qui Nguyen.
9/28/15 Viewers still have a shared conversation, it's just on multiple platforms The New York Times Victoria E. Johnson, associate professor of film and media studies at the University of California, Irvine, writes on the mutiple platform conversation that consists of both tech-savvy and traditional viewers.
9/25/15 Of great Ngugi event and lots of don's lies Daily Nation Ngugi wa Thiong’o gave a public lecture at the Kisii University in which he remarked that a "person who embraces a foreign language and abandons his mother-tongue is a slave”.
9/24/15 Smooth talker: Chinese President Xi Jinping has never met a country he didn't like Slate Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of history, writes on Chinese President Xi Jinping's House of Cards reference as not just a reflection of his familiarity with American pop culture, but of something in the PR playbook.
9/24/15 Pope to Congress on climate change: "I am convinced we can make a difference." The Huffington Post Jack Miles, director of religious studies at UC Irvine, writes on Ramanathan's appearance  with the Dalai Lama at UC Irvine for the Tibetan leader's 80th birthday celebration and also his discussion on "the elimination of the fossil-fuel step on the path from wood-burning energy to solar energy.”
9/23/15 Pope Francis' call to house refugees echoes church history The Conversation Elizabeth Allen , associate professor of English, University of California, Irvine, comments, “As a scholar working on the idea of sanctuary in medieval literature, I am struck by the extent of the pope’s embrace of migrants and refugees, whom he has said the Church should shelter 'without distinction or limits... without frontiers.'"
9/23/15 "Masters of the People": China's new urban poor Dissent Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s Professor of history, interviews Dorothy Solinger, professor of political science.
9/21/15 #BlackLivesMatter and the myth of postracial America The Conversation David Theo Goldberg, director of the University of California Humanities Research Institute, writes, "As I demonstrate in my most recent book,  Are We All Postracial Yet?, insisting that black lives matter is necessary because – unlike 'all lives' in this society – black lives are too often taken not to matter."
9/20/15 Hurricane Katrina's scars are on display at UCI gallery The LA Times LA Times writer Brittany Woolsey writes on the UCI gallery of Hurricane Katrina created by Jonathan Alexander, professor of English: "Jonathan Alexander's memories of Hurricane Katrina threatening his hometown in Louisiana 10 years ago seared his mind."
9/17/15 Why sanctuary cities must exist Los Angeles Times In this article by Elizabeth Allen, associate professor of English, the history of sanctuary cities is brought to light.
9/16/15 Despite decades of exile, I still feel the pull of my homeland Gulf News Ngugu wa Thiong’o, Distinguished Professor of English and comparative literature, expresses in this opinion article, "I never chose exile; it was forced on me."
9/15/16 National book award poetry longlist announced Los Angeles Times The shortlist for the awards is to be announced October 15th, which includes Amy Gerstler, professor in the School of Humanities. The winners will then be announced at the gala in New York on November 18th.
9/14/15 Sex ed. unfiltered: How actress Jessica Biel and activist Saundra Pelletier are helping women understand their bodies Glamour Magazine Erika Hayasaki, associate professor of literary journalism, writes, "Actress Jessica Biel and activist Saundra Pelletier, founder of the nonprofit health care organization WomanCare Global, are launching a series of online videos geared to helping women understand their bodies."
September Issue Iranian hopes and fears Le Monde diplomatique In an article about the Iran nuclear deal, Touraj Daryaee, Maseeh Chair in Persian Studies and Culture and director of Dr. Samuel M. Jordan Center for Persian Studies and Culture, expresses a hopeful perspective.
8/31/15 The intriguing politics of Asian food The Huffington Post The author of this article discusses Chinese food politics as they play out in two food-focused history books, one being Chop Suey, USA, authored by Yong Chen, professor of history.
8/31/15 The Rust Belt: Once mighty cities in decline MSNBC Andrew Highsmith, assistant professor of history, provides expert commentary in this article about Flint, Michigan and how General Motors' demise affected the city.
8/30/15 40 years after Saigon's fall, O.C. exhibit tells Vietnamese Americans' stories Los Angeles Times Article features OC Parks and the UC Irvine Vietnamese American Oral History Project (VAOHP)'s interactive art and history exhibition. Linda Trinh Vo, director of the Vietnamese American Oral History Project and professor of Asian American studies, is quoted.
8/28/15 Is there a teaching moment in the Ashley Madison hack? The Conversation Peter Krapp, professor and chair of film & media studies, discusses the cyber security issues related to the .edu email addresses hacked from the Ashley Madison website.
8/27/15 There be dragons Los Angeles Review of Books Maura Elizabeth Cunningham (Ph.D. in history, '14) reviews a new China-set crime thriller, Dragon Day. References former Q&A conducted between Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of History, and the author, Lisa Brackmann.
8/27/15 China's Wanda buys Ironman race series Marketplace "Well, we’ve heard stories about skiing being poised to explode, we’ve been hearing about other things," said Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of History, "But they are real niche things, and there is a bit of oversell.”
8/25/15 Liu: la bolla è una vergogna nazionale, aumentati i suicidi Il Mattino Catherine Liu, professor of film & media studies, is quoted in an Italian publication about China's stock market turmoil and how it impacts Chinese investors and the new Chinese middle class. She discusses "how economic strength and growth legitimized the Chinese Communist Party's rule and the CCP's attempt to spur consumer spending." She also discusses media censorship & that "there seems to be a wave of stock market related suicides that have been censored." Article is in Italian. 
8/24/15  New Orleans taught me the meaning of home Zocalo Public Square Jonathan Alexander, professor of English, education, and gender & sexuality studies, shares his story about finding home amongst the wreckage of Hurricane Katrina.
8/23/15 Should Matisyahu play at a peace festival? Aljazeera Mark LeVine, professor of modern Middle Eastern history, discusses artistic freedom.
8/21/15 The odd couple: On political dissent and the remarkable similarities between Mark Twain and Yu Hua Los Angeles Review of Books "What if Yu Hua had become the first Chinese author, still based in China, to win a Nobel Prize for Literature?" Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of History, discusses the similarities between Yu Hua and Mark Twain.
8/21/15 Not your father's Chinese restaurant China Daily USA Yong Chen, professor of history, is quoted in this article on Chinese restaurateurs who are attempting to redefine their cuisine in America.
8/18/15 The Kids Are Alright: Chinese youths are taught to be skeptical of foreign powers, but the Internet has linked them more closely to global culture The Wall Street Journal Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of History, discusses two books on Chinese millennials.
8/6/15 Mildly rich people problems Slate Catherine Liu, professor of film & media studies and author of American Idyll: Academic Antielitism as Cultural Critique is quoted in this story about the rising unaffordability of elite independent schools.
8/3/15 Obama’s election was supposed to usher in a new post-racial era. Why has racist expression grown more vicious than any time since the 1960s? Salon David Theo Goldberg, director of the systemwide University of California Humanities Research Institute, executive director of the Digital Media and Learning Research Hub, and professor of comparative literature and anthropology at UCI, has a new book challenging the idea of the “post-racial.” Are We All Postracial Yet? (Polity Press, 2015) posits that post-raciality is simply another incarnation of racism. In this article, he explains why racist expression has grown more vicious with the rise of the "postracial."
8/3/15 New exhibit captures complexities of Vietnamese in Orange County OC Weekly OC Parks and the UC Irvine Vietnamese American Oral History Project (VAOHP) present this interactive art and history exhibition, which captures the compelling and complex Vietnamese experience before, during and after the Vietnam War. Linda Trinh Vo, director of the Vietnamese American Oral History Project and professor of Asian American studies, is quoted.
7/29/15 The impact of Confucius: A Q&A with Michael Schuman Los Angeles Review of Books Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of History, conducts a Q&A with Michael Schuman, author of Confucius and the World He Created (Basic Books, 2015)
7/21/15 A change in taste for Chinese communities KCET In this California Matters episode, Mark Bittman is accompanied by Yong Chen, professor of history and the author of Chop Suey, USA: The Story of Chinese Food in America.
7/21/15 Kids in the aftermath: Katrina in young adult fiction Los Angeles Review of Books Jonathan Alexander, professor of English, education, and gender & sexuality studies, has reviews four young adult novels centered on Hurricane Katrina to decipher how they grapple with tragedy and larger socio-political issues.
7/19/15 The dismantling of higher education (Opinion) Aljazeera Mark LeVine, professor of modern Middle Eastern history, writes an opinion piece about the "downtrend in funding for university research."
7/17/15 How Chinese food in America evolved from shark fins to beef with broccoli Yahoo! Yong Chen, associate professor of history, explains the genesis of Chinese food in America.
7/15/15 Iran nuclear deal offers flicker of hope to Persians in Southern California Los Angeles Times Roxanne Varzi, associate professor of film & media studies and anthropology expresses her thoughts on the Iran deal: "I think anything that moves us toward opening up relations and turns us away from military actions is good"; "There's so much the two countries need to work on together."
7/15/15 Touraj Daryaee, UCI professor from Iran, says nuclear pact could thaw relations with U.S. OC Weekly Touraj Daryaee, Maseeh Chair in Persian Studies and Culture, expresses his belief that the alternative to the Iran nuclear deal is war.
7/14/15 OC representatives critical of Iranian nuclear deal: While sharply divided along party lines, most OC political leaders condemned the President's deal with Iran Laguna Beach Patch Touraj Daryaee, Maseeh Chair in Persian Studies and Culture, expresses his opinions on the Iran deal.
7/14/15 ‘Chop Suey’s next wave The New York Times In this California Matters episode, Mark Bittman is accompanied by Yong Chen, professor of history and the author of Chop Suey, USA: The Story of Chinese Food in America.
7/13/15 Why war keeps knocking on Gaza's door (Opinion) Aljazeera Mark LeVine, professor of modern Middle Eastern history, wrote an op-ed on the "weaponization of human rights in Gaza."
7/4/15 What's that on your shirt? Orange County Register Maria Pantelia, professor of classics, discusses the Greek and Roman lettering used in popular clothing logos.
6/27/15 Panda Express test kitchen is in search of the next orange chicken Los Angeles Times Yong Chen, a professor of history, discusses the Americanization of Chinese food.
6/19/15 The Shakespeare algorithm The New Yorker Robert Folkenflik, an emeritus professor of English, discusses whether the tragicomedy "Double Falsehood" is Shakespeare's own.
6/10/15 See what Professor Ngugi wa Thiongo told Uhuru before he requested him to come back Daily Post Kenya Ngugi requested professor uhuru Kenyatta's government to punish teachers who beat up students for speaking their native language.
6/5/15 Killing tenure is academia’s point of no return Aljazeera  Mark LeVine, professor of modern Middle Eastern history, shares his view that discontinuing tenure will spark a process of "complete corporatization of higher education."
6/4/15 Police Racism: A search for answers Blueprint Erika Hayasaki, associate professor of literary journalism, discusses the research on police statistics and race being conducted by Phillip Atiba Goff, co-founder of the Center for Policing Equity at UCLA.
6/4/15 25 Moments That Changed America Time Vicki Ruiz, Distinguished Professor of History and Chicano/Latino Studies, cited signing of The Immigration and Nationality Act (Oct. 3, 1965) as one of the top 25 moments that changed America.
6/4/15 China's 'slow-motion revolution' has stalled Los Angeles Times Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of History, co-authored this piece about the current state of post-communist Chinese society.
6/3/15 Egyptian-American activist Mohamed Soltan’s release from an Egyptian prison is bittersweet Muftah Mark LeVine, professor of modern Middle Eastern history, is quoted about an Egyptian activist event.
6/2/15 Why Ngugi Wa Thiongo met Raila Odinga and avoided meeting Uhuru/ Ruto Daily Post Kenya Ngugi Wa Thiongo, Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature, visits Kenya 50 years after his first novel, Weep Not Child (1964), published.
6/1/15 Ngugi in Kenya for writing career fete Daily Nation Renowned writer and Professor of English and Comparative Literature Ngugi wa Thiong’o arrived in Nairobi on Monday night for two weeks of celebrations to mark 50 years since his first novel was published.
6/1/15 Why it pays to be a jerk The Atlantic Aaron James, professor of Philosophy, contributes to the new "research" of the workplace advantage of being a jerk - he quotes from his book, Assholes, a Theory
5/30/15 The Summer Writing Project kicks off today: Novellas online, one suspenseful chapter at a time Daily Pilot Emeritus professor of English, Robert Newsom, explains how the slow release of novellas can both impact the author's creative process and engage the readers.
5/28/15 Thirty-eight scholars will visit the Getty to study the materials of art and the history of classical Egypt The Getty Iris Professor of Art History, Bert Winther-Tamaki to be this year’s consortium professor, pursuing his own research project on Japanese art while also teaching a winter course open to students from southern California universities.
5/28/15 China’s publishers court America as its authors scorn censorship The New York Times Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of History, discusses the politics of publishing between China and the West.
5/23/15 Chat & selfie: Bad fortune cookies, critics from Mars and crab Rangoon Los Angeles Times Yong Chen, professor of history, still does ardent research comparing chinese food with demographic and cultural shifts in the US. He gives a casual scoop with one of the California section writers of the LA Times.
5/21/15 Asian-Americans packing on political muscle Diverse Issues in Higher Education Linda Trinh Vo, director of the Vietnamese American Oral History Project and professor of Asian American studies, cautions aginst assuming stereotypes about Asian-American candidates.
5/20/15 Penn State hack exposes theft risk of student personal data The Conversation Peter Krapp, professor of film & media studies, provides expert commentary on the Penn State hack in May of 2015.
5/19/15 Yasiin Bey (AKA Mos Def) speaks on Malcolm X with UCI Hip-Hop Professor Sohail Daulatzai OC Weekly Sohail Daulatzai, associate professor of film & media studies and African American studies, interviews Yasiin Bey (aka Mos Def) and asks him about Malcolm X.
5/8/15 Without Edward Snowden, system could have failed Time Barry Siegel, director of our Literary Journalism Program, contributed to After Snowden: Privacy, Secrecy and Security in the Information Age
5/7/15 APIA electorate to double by 2040 Asian American Press Linda Trinh Vo, director of the Vietnamese American Oral History Project and professor of Asian American studies, is quoted about the importance of Asian American visibility and voting power)
5/7/15 The quantum mechanics of Israeli totalitarianism Aljazeera Mark LeVine, professor of modern Middle Eastern history, discusses his view of Israel's "all-encompasing 'matrix of control'" over the occupied territories.
5/1/15 Diary of a mad Newport Beach Film Festival starring the ghost of Wes Anderson OC Weekly Associate Professor of Film & Media Studies Catherine Benamou served as a panelist for a discussion on Orson Welles at the Newport Beach Film Festival.
5/1/15 Big muscle in Little Saigon: The rise of Vietnamese Americans as a political force in Orange County Orange County Register Linda Trinh Vo, director of the Vietnamese American Oral History Project and professor of Asian American studies, shares insight on the emergent political influence of Vietnamese Americans.
4/30/15 Why are we losing in the Middle East? Too much STEM, not enough Humanities The World Post Distinguished Professor of English and Religious Studies, Jack Miles, comments on the negative reprocussions that the dearth of historical understanding and religious sensitivity causes on US relations overseas.
4/30/15 How they became us: Orange County changed forever in the 40 years since the fall of Saigon Orange County Register Linda Trinh Vo, director of the Vietnamese American Oral History Project and professor of Asian American studies, contributes her expertise to this story on how the resilience and hardwork of Vietnamese immigrants to Orange County transformed the community.
4/29/15 Vietnamese-Americans recall losses, gains since Saigon Fell Associated Press Linda Trinh Vo, director of the Vietnamese American Oral History Project and professor of Asian American studies, discusses the urgency to collect the stories of Vietnamese survivors of the Fall of Saigon.
4/28/15 The people's pope and the chairman of everything Los Angeles Review of Books Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of History, was inspired to write the piece while news was breaking simultaneously on opposite sides of the world of Xi Jinping’s expected move from vice president to President of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and of Pope Francis’s surprising selection as the new head of the Catholic Church. He compares how the media in each respective sphere craft a specific narrative around their leaders.
4/25/15 Fall of Saigon memories, 40 years later UT San Diego Jon Weiner, professor of history, comments on how the Vietnam War divided Americans more than anything since the Civil War.
4/23/15 End deaths on the sea by ending the wars around it Palestinian Pundit and Aljazeera Mark LeVine, professor of modern Middle Eastern history, confronts the grief and despair resulting from a massacre in the Mediterranean and cites global reasons for the atrocity.
4/19/15 Black feminism is: Reflections on the Black Feminist Think Tank Symposium Jadaliyya Emily Thuma, assistant professor of gender & sexuality studies, discusses her collective work at the Black Feminist Think Tank symposium.
4/19/15 Eastern Approaches The Wall Street Journal Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of History, reviews Henry M. Paulson's Dealing With China: An Insider Unmasks the New Economic Superpower.
4/18/15 Bringing dead actors back to life Newsweek Professor of Film & Media Studies Peter Krapp wonders if digital techniques succeed in resurrecting old movie stars for a modern audience, and how audiences will react if such practices become commonplace.
4/15/15 Vietnam in the battlefield of memory The Nation Jon Weiner, professor of history, writes on the ongoing activism against the Pentagon's whitewashed history.
4/12/15 The function of criticism at the present time Los Angeles Review of Books Virginia Jackson, UCI Endowed Chair in Rhetoric, considers feminist theorist Lauren Berlant's perspective on genre.
4/1/15 Buried alive in a grain silo Longreads Assistant Professor of literary journalism Erika Hayasaki's Amazon Kindle Single "Drowned by Corn" is featured in Long Reads.
March Issue The Gift of Mentorship Perspectives on History - Newsmagazine of the American Historical Association Article by Vicki Ruiz, President of the AHA, about her experience on both sides of the mentorship equation. Professors Anita Casavantes Bradford and Ana Elizabeth Rosas of our history department also mentioned.
3/27/25 CI to host historian and author Vicki Ruiz for "The Right to Remember: Latina Labor Leaders in California Agriculture" Ventura County Star CSU Channel Islands will host Vicki Ruiz, Distinguished Professor of History, for a special presentation on Latina Labor Leaders in California Agriculture between 1939 and 1961.
3/24/15 Koreans have an insatiable appetite for watching strangers binge eat NPR Kyung Kim, professor of East Asian languages & literature, shares his thoughts on Korea's latest peculiar eating fad.
3/24/15 Chinese Cultural Center marks 10 years at Irvine Orange County Register Yong Chen, professor of history, is quoted regarding the South Coast Chinese Cultural Center.
3/23/15 The future of a failed state The Nation Amy Wilentz, professor of English, comments on the external factors which contributed to the critical state of Haiti.
3/21/15 At midnight in Jenin, the smell of resistance Aljazeera Mark LeVine, professor of modern Middle Eastern history, discusses the continued strife in the West Bank, especially in response to the latest Israeli election results.
3/19/15 Why Bibi won: Israel unwilling to pay the price of hope Reuters Amy Wilentz, professor of English, speculates on the charged circumstances surrounding Netanyahu's re-election.
3/19/15 UC Irvine Professor Sohail Daulatzai is doc hip-hop OC Weekly Feature article on Sohail Daulatzai, associate professor of film & media studies and African American studies, whose research on hip-hop music and culture has been cited in African-American studies, history, and Islamic music circles.
3/11/15 Viola Davis personal story will make you love her even more Glamour Magazine Erika Hayasaki, assistant professor of literary journalism, writes about Viola Davis's inspirational trajectory - from hunger to headliners.
3/11/15 The Education of an Interloper Moment Magazine Jack Miles, Distinguished Professor of English and Religious Studies, writes about commensurability and compassion when studying world religions.
3/10/15 Why do Chinese mothers look to Southern California – specifically Irvine – for birth tourism? It's more than just baby's U.S. citizenship Orange County Register Yong Chen, professor of hisory, and Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of History, are quoted in this article about Chinese "birth tourism."
3/5/15 How Chinese and Americans understand culture The Diplomat Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of History, is cited in this article about the way that Chinese people understand/articulate/demonstrate their culture.
3/4/15 Houellebecq Skewers French Academe The Chronicle of Higher Education Eve Morisi, assistant professor of French, shares her praise for who studied at Paris 7, noted the rigor of her professors and the rich diversity of the student body.
3/3/15 China: Self-Censorship Displaces Western Threats The Diplomat Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of History, delivered a public lecture at  Columbia University where he discussed censorship in China.
2/26/15 VSU welcomes Ngugi Wa Thiong’o to campus The Valdosta Daily Times Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature Ngugi Wa Thiong'o visited Valdosta State University in Georgia. Article features detailed biography of Wa Thiong'o.
2/25/15 For these Cuban Americans living in Orange County, theirs is a house divided Orange County Register Anita Casavantes Bradford, associate professor of history & Chicano/Latino studies, quoted in regards to immigration and generational tensions between Cuba and the United States
2/23/15 Oscars 2015: Expert reaction The Conversation This expert panel features Catherine Liu, professor of film & media studies, and faculty reactions to the 87th Academy Awards
2/20/15 The Legacy of Malcom X WUNC 91.5 - North Carolina Public Radio Listen to a panel of scholars, featuring our own Sohail Daulatzai (Film & Media Studies, African-American Studies), reflect on the 50-year legacy of civil rights leader Malcom X.
2/20/15 The Latest: A culinary journey; a spiritual quest Daily Pilot Features Yong Chen, professor of history, regarding his book, Chop Suey, USA, and how the blossoming of Chinese cuisine in America is one of the "greatest epic stories of cultural exchange in world history.
2/20/15 Why publish an op-ed article by President Obama? Los Angeles Times Professor of History Jon Wiener's exchange with Nick Goldberg, editorial director of the LA Times, about the decision to give further attention to the man with the "biggest megaphone on the planet."
2/19/15 Review: 'Age of Acquiescence' examines America's second Gilded Age Los Angeles Times Professor of History Jon Wiener reviews The Age of Acquiescence, which explores why the disparities of wealth and power have not sparked a revolt in the United States.
2/19/15 Cuban Heritage Collection receives $2M gift myScience.org Associate Professor Anita Casavantes Bradford's research at the Cuban Heritage Collection (CHC) inspired in part a $2 million dollar gift from the Goizueta Foundation that will lead to the CHC's Graduate Fellowship Program's expansion mentioned.
2/18/15 The debate over an autism cure turns hostile Newsweek Erika Hayasaki, assistant professor of literary journalism, shares the story of Jonathan Mitchell, an LA-area autistic man who feels that a cure for autism is possible.
2/18/15 Youth protest Hong Kong style: A Q&A on "Lessons in Dissent"' with Filmmaker Matthew Torne Huffington Post Chancellor's Professor of History, Jeffrey Wasserstrom interviews British filmmaker Matthew Torne about his documentary, "Lessons in Dissent," an analysis of the 2012 Hong Kong protests
2/13/15 Forever 21 at MainPlace Mall rides the rice paddy hat-wearing mannequin trend OC Weekly James Kyung-Jin Lee, professor of Asian American studies, corroborates commentary against F21's "orientalizing" mannequin display.
2/13/15 Death is having a moment in academia Daily Pilot Assistant Professor of literary journalism Erika Hayasaki writes an op-ed about the increasing interest in, and scholarship on, mortality.
2/11/15 Annual authors luncheon returns for 15th year Orange County Register Professor of English, Michelle Latiolais, presented her work at the annual Southern California Authors' Luncheon, sponsored by the San Clemente Friends of the Library.
2/11/15 Egypt's ultras: fast and furious Aljazeera Mark LeVine, professor of modern Middle Eastern history, details the unrest and serial massacres in Egypt.
2/9/15 Camus, Charlie et le terrorisme Le Huffington Post Assistant Professor of French Ève Morisi comments on the recent Charlie Hebdo tragedy using Albert Camus's work (Article is in French).
2/8/15 The Problem with the Grammys Aljazeera Mark LeVine, professor of modern Middle Eastern history, criticizes the Grammy Awards for serving the lowest musical or aesthetic demoniator.
2/7/15 Chop Suey, USA: The Story of Chinese Food in America KCRW Yong Chen, professor of history, narrates the 150 year lineage of Chinese restaurants in the United States.
2/6/15 U.S. scholars express strong protest against Japan's attempt to 'censor history' The Korea Herald Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of History, is one of 19 scholars who co-signed a joint statement against Japan's attempts to censor the atroicities of WWII.
2/5/15 Claiming freedom: From Writers Week to #BlackPoetsSpeakOut KCET Jon Weiner, professor of history, is mentioned in this piece as the co-author of Setting the Night on Fire: Los Angeles in the 1960s with social historian Mike Davis.
2/1/15 Battered Lives: Santa Ana’s Ongoing Struggle With Domestic Violence Voice of OC Amy DePaul, lecturer in our Literary Journalism program, is the author of this article on domestic violence in Santa Ana
1/26/15 The day the purpose of college changed The Chronicle of Higher Education Catherine Liu, professor in our Film and Media Studies Department, discusses how the purpose of college has changed over time.
1/21/15 When films and facts collide in questions: ‘Selma’ questions are nothing new for historical films The New York Times Jerome Christensen, professor of English and film scholar, is quoted throughout this article on the movie, Selma
1/19/15 Selma blurs line between past and present The Conversation Mary Schmitt, Ph.D candidate in Visual Studies, authored this article on Selma
1/10/15 Somersaulting into America Time Erika Hayasaki, professor in our Literary Journalism Program, authored this essay
1/9/15 The chance to be a landowner Zocalo Public Square As part of the series, "Women and the Myth of the American West: What it Means to be American," Vicki Ruiz, Distinguished Professor of History and chair of Chicano/Latino studies, authored this essay which also published in Time.

Date Title Outlet Notes
12/26/14 The elusive Chinese dream The New York Times Op-ed written by Chancellor's Professor of History, Jeffrey Wasserstrom.
12/25/14 Jack Miles' return to religion Salon Article discusses Distinguished Professor of English & Religious Studies, Jack Miles', Norton Anthology of World Religions.
12/24/14 How did Chinese become America's favorite ethnic cuisine? Orange County Register Feature on Yong Chen, professor of history, and his book, Chop Suey, USA: The Story of Chinese Food in America.
12/17/14 Prospects for quick cuban sugar comeback not so sweet The Wall Street Journal Steven Topik, professor of history, is quoted.
12/11/14 Q&A In Hong Kong, a passionate but mostly peaceful campaign for democracy Los Angeles Times Op-ed written by Chancellor's Professor of History, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, answers questions about the Hong Kong protests
12/10/14 The changing meaning of Chinatown Los Angeles KPCC Yong Chen, professor of history, is one of three guests who discuss the changing landscape of Chinatown.
12/5/14 A frail face becomes a defiant focus of Hong Kong’s waning protest movement The New York Times Chancellor's Professor of History, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, is quoted in this article about the Hong Kong protests.
11/21/14 Hong Kong visions Los Angeles Review of Books Chancellor's Professor of History, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, takes a look back at his recent visit to Hong Kong.
11/19/14 Why karaoke is Important to immigrants in OC OC Weekly Christine Balance, an assistant professor of Asian American Studies, is quoted in this article.
11/19/14 The end of eyewitness testimonies Newsweek Article written by Erika Hayasaki, professor in our Literary Journalism program.
11/16/14 Book review: sites of race by David Theo Goldberg The London School of Economics and Political Science A review of Professor of Comparative Literature, David Theo's, book, Sites of Race.
11/14/14 Worlds of rape, words of rape Nursing Clio Professor of history, Sharon Block, discusses recent college rape case.
11/11/14 L.A.’s Chinese investment boom, new visa policy, and the great mayo war KCRW Chancellor's Professor of History, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, discusses China's new visa policy.
11/2/14 Legions of faiths, girded for battle Norton’s Latest Anthology explores world religion The New York Times Article discusses Distinguished Professor of English & Religious Studies, Jack Miles' Norton Anthology of World Religions.
Nov/Dec 2014 Sea captains changed the Pacific world: David Igler explains how Humanities: The Magazine for the National Endowment for the Humanities David Igler, professor of history, answers interesting questions related to his book, The Great Ocean.